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Peru Flag

Shop for authentic Peru Flags. We offer indoor and outdoor Peru flags in durable nylon. Our outdoor flags are finished with a canvas heading, while indoor flags are finished with a lined pole hem and your choice of with or without fringe. We also offer indoor and outdoor Peru flag sets. In addition to the flags we offer for purchase, we maintain an archive of the audio for the Peru National Anthem, historical information about the Peru flag, and demographic data about Peru

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History of the Peru Flag

The Peru Flag consists of three vertical bands in the colors of red, white, and red. In the middle of the white band is the country's national coat of arms. The red colors represent the blood that was lost in the struggle for independence, the sacrifices made by those who fought and defended the country, as well as red being the color of the Incas. The white color represents the peace, the purity of the country, justice and freedom. The coast of arms (known as "Escudo De Armas" in Spanish) represents the country’s history, its geography and flora and fauna.

The Coat of Arms features the Cinchona tree, which is a tree that is native to this part of South America, it features a gold cornucopia (ornament in the shape of a goat's horn) which has coins spilling from it and represents the country’s wealthy mineral resources. It also features a Vicuna, which is a South American animal that resembles a llama. The Peru Flag was designed by Jose de San Martin who led Peru to independence and was adopted on February 25th, 1823, making it one of the world's oldest flags.

Peru is a country in South America that shares borders with Ecuador, Chile, Colombia, Bolivia, and Brazil. Its capital city is called Lima. Peru is a country that has been home to many empires and civilizations throughout history, including the Norte Chico Civilization, which is considered one of the oldest civilizations in the world and the Inca Empire. The Incas were an Indian Civilization who built a rich empire and ruled for over 100 years before the Spanish arrived in the nation. The Incas were very rich in gold and silver, which is what attracted the Spanish to Peru during the 1500s.

In 1811, Jose de San Martin (designer of the national flag) began his fight in South America for independence, beginning with Buenos Aires. In 1817, however, he changed his army and led an army of 5,000 men through the Andes to invade Chile and gain independence. He followed this success by taking his army to Peru and declaring independence of the country in 1821. Peru celebrates Independence Day on July 28th and 29th each year and is known as "Fiestas Patrias" (Patriotic Holidays).

Peru is a popular tourist destination, mainly due to the history of the country and the historic ruins and remains that can be visited, which include, buildings that were built by the Inca Empire which can be found in the town of Macchu Picchu and Cuzco. Tourists also choose to visit Peru to visit the Amazon rainforest (Peru is home to a great portion of the rainforest, after Brazil) and to climb the various mountain ranges, particularly the Andes mountains.

A lot of the residents of Peru live in poor conditions and poverty, even though the country has one of the richest sources of silver and copper, as well as lead, in the world.

Geographic Coordinates
10 00 S, 76 00 W
Area
1,285,216 sq km
Population
29,907,003
Life Expectancy
71.03 years
Government Type
Constitutional Republic
Capital
Lima
GDP
$253 billion (2009 est.)
Unemployment
8.1% (2009 est.)
Currency
Nuevo Sol (PEN)
Calling Code
+51
Internet TLD
.pe

Peru National Anthem

Peruvian National Anthem (Himno Nacional del Peru)

Listen

Lyrics

We are free!
may we always be so ,may we always be so!
and let the sun rather deny its light
its lights, its lights...the sun!
Before allow us to break the solemn vow
which the motherland elevated to the Eternal
Before allow us to break the solemn vow
which the motherland elevated to the Eternal
Before allow us to break the solemn vow
which the motherland elevated to the Eternal.

For a long time the oppressed Peruvian
dragged the ominous chain;
sentenced to a cruel servitude
for a long time , for a long time
for a long time in silence he moaned.
But as soon as the sacred cry
"Liberty!" was heard on its coasts,
he shook off the indolence of slavery,
the humiliated , the humiliated
the humiliated neck he raised
the humiliated neck he raised
the neck he raised!.

Now the roar of rough chains
that we had heard for three centuries of horror
from the free, at the sacred cry
that the world heard astonished, ceased.
Everywhere the inflamed San Martín
"Liberty", "Liberty" pronounced;
and the Andes, rocking their base,
announced it as well, in unison.

With its influx the peoples woke up,
and like lighting ran the opinion;
from the Isthmus to Tierra del Fuego,
and from Tierra del Fuego to the icy region.
Everyone vowed to break the link
that Nature denied to both worlds,
and break the sceptre that Spain
had reclined, proud, on both.

Lima fulfilled this solemn vow,
and, severe, its anger showed
by throwing out the powerless tyrant,
who had been trying to extend his oppression.
On its endeavor the shackles cracked,
and the furrows that it had repaired in itself
stirred up its hatred and vengeance,
inherited from its Inca and Lord.

Countrymen, may we see it a slave no more.
If for three centuries it moaned, humiliated,
forever may we swear it'd be free,
maintaining its own splendor.
Our arms, until today unarmed,
be they always readying the cannon,
that some day the beaches of Iberia
will feel the horror of its roar.

May we arouse the jealousy of Spain
since it has a premonition, with want and furor,
that in a contest of great nations
our country will enter in comparison.
On the list formed by these
we shall fill the line first,
ahead of the ambitious Iberian tyrant,
who devastated all of America.

On its summit may the Andes sustain
the two-color flag or standard,
may it announce to the centuries the effort
that being free gave us forever.
Under its shadow may we live calmly
and, at the sun's birth over its summits,
may we renew the great oath
we rendered to the God of Jacob.